Albany: 8th Grade Lesson Plan
Non-Violence

This curriculum is based on the video clips, stories and discussion questions, and activities housed in the Web-site Freedom on Film: The Civil Rights Movement in Georgia. The lessons are based on Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) updated as of May 2007. The purpose of the lessons in the Freedom on Film on freedom curriculum is to guide teachers on how to instruct students on the events, historical figures, personalities and key principals of the Civil Rights Movement, using examples from its impact in nine Georgia cities and towns, in accordance with GPS guidelines.

Letters and numbers in parenthesis indicate the recommended course and skill levels. For example, SS8H11= Social Studies, 11-Skill Number. For current Georgia Performance Standards, go to http://www.georgiastandards.org/socialstudies.aspx.

Significance of Non-Violence Method in the Civil Rights Movement

Students will be able to identify the success of non-violent approaches in the Civil Rights Movement in Georgia. By reading stories on the Freedom on Film web-site, they will be able to understand how the non-violence approaches were successfully used to achieve the goals of the Civil rights movement. They will recognize how the Albany Movement successfully used a non-violence approach to achieve de-segregation. The student will also be able to create written, oral, and visual presentations about no-violence and demonstrate an understanding of its impact on the Civil Rights movement.

Students will demonstrate an understanding that even though civil rights are not freely given they can be gained using a non-violent approach. They will also understand that even though the approach is non-violent on the part of those staging it they can be met by a violent retaliation police as was the case in the Albany Movement. They should be able to identify significant leaders of the civil rights movement who championed non-violence.

Primary learning outcomes (Teacher’s Questions for Students)

What was the catalyst that propelled and held together the non-violent movements? What inspired them? What are the specific activities associated with non violence compared to a violence approach? The Albany Movement was officially activated on? What was the reaction of the slow pace of social change through non-violence among the younger black people? When did the Albany Movement end? What explains the presence of majority black students in the previously white predominant public schools in Albany?

Additional learning outcomes (Teacher’s Questions for Students)

Who introduced the non violence philosophy into the civil rights movement? Who is inspired activist Dr. Martin Luther King to adopt the non-violence stance? What does the philosophy advocate for? What is the distinction between Philosophical Non-Violence and tactical Non-Violence? What where some of the flaws of the Albany Movement?

____________________________________________________________

Assessed Georgia Performance Standards
Grade 8: Social Studies
(Note: specific skills addressed are italicized)

SS8H11 The student will evaluate the role of Georgia in the modern Civil Rights Movement.

  1. Describe major developments in civil rights and Georgia's role during the 1940s and 1950s; include the roles of Herman Talmadge, Benjamin Mays, the 1946 governor's race and the end of the white primary, Brown v. Board of Education, Martin Luther King, Jr., and the 1956 state flag.
  2. Analyze the role Georgia and prominent Georgians played in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s and 1970s; include such events as the founding of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Sibley Commission, admission of Hamilton Holmes and Charlayne Hunter to the University of Georgia, Albany Movement, March on Washington, Civil Rights Act, the election of Maynard Jackson as mayor of Atlanta, and the role of Lester Maddox.
  3. Discuss the impact of Andrew Young on Georgia.

____________________________________________________________

Procedures/Learning Activities

Class and Web Activity on Non-Violence

Materials and Equipment

  1. Web link to Freedom on Film web-site or handouts containing the site contents if there is no computer and/ internet access.
  2. Writing materials
  3. Colored construction paper (at least two different colors)

Step 1: Duration – 30 Minutes

Introduce students to the concept of segregation by distributing two sets of directly colored pieces of paper randomly to form two equal groups (if the groups are not demographically balanced make the appropriate changes). “Segregate” one of the two groups by asking then to turn their desks and face the back of the room or away from the class activity area.
Lead the half of the class that is facing the front of the class through an unrelated class discussion from previous class sessions while ignoring the others. You may also scribble something interesting on the white board or play a humorous animated soundless clip on the projector that is likely to elicit laughter from the class. At some point, the students will begin to be uncomfortable at their treatment and you can then turn the discussion and their desks around to civil rights and the concept of segregation.

Step 2: Duration – 20 Minutes

Divide the class into groups that consist of an equal number of those who were earlier “segregated” and those who were not and ask the groups to discuss the what it is like to learn in a segregated classroom, or how did they feel about learning in such a classroom and what they would have done to get their rights back. Would they have turned violent or tried to use a non-violent approach?

Step 3: Duration – 20 Minutes

Bring the class together and get volunteers from each group to share what they discussed in the groups. Make additions and discuss the highlights of the areas explored them introduce the students to non violence by reading and studying the links of the following Freedom on Film stories of the Albany Movement (Albany):- Integrating the Carnegie Library, Clergy protest and/or the Trailways bus station sit in.

Total Duration
70 minutes  

____________________________________________________________

Sample Discussion or Worksheet Questions

  1. Who introduced the non violence philosophy in to the civil rights movement?
  2. Who inspired activist Dr. Martin Luther King to adopt the non-violence stance?
  3. What does the philosophy advocate for?
  4. What are the two kinds of non-violent approaches?
  5. Why was non-violence used by the Albany movement?
  6. Why is it called non-violence yet violence was meted on the participant?
  7. What was the reaction of the slow pace of social change through non-violence among the younger black people?
  8. What specific tactics did the non-violence used by the Albany Movement employ?
  9. How did the segregationists counter the tactics?
  10. What was powerful and effective for the Civil Rights activists about passive and nonviolent resistance? What were their motives?
  11. How did the Albany police force benefit from responding nonviolently to the activists? What were their motives?
  12. How did young people define the Albany Movement in response to their own needs?

____________________________________________________________

Procedures/Learning Activities

Journal- Writing Activity on Non-Violence

Materials and Equipment

  1. Web link to Freedom on Film web-site or handouts containing the site contents if there is no computer and/ internet access.
  2. Writing materials

Step 1: Duration – 30 Minutes

Introduce the students to non violence by reading and studying the links of the following Freedom on Film stories: the Albany movement (Albany) and the clip of the students being arrested for protesting in front of city Hall.

Step 2: Duration –20 Minutes

Discuss with the class about other different non-violent strategies the protesting the “Stretcher Arrests” clip would have used. The following questions can help guide the discussions: What were the benefits of passive and nonviolent resistance? What were their motives? How did the Albany police force respond to the nonviolence? Ask the student to support their entries using the Freedom on Film website story on Albany movement story and the clip about the arrest of students protesting in front of city hall

Step 3: Duration – 30 Minutes

Ask the students to write a one page journal entry describing what they think it is like to learn in a segregated classroom and what non-violent strategies they would have used to change the situation. Ask the student to support their entries using the Freedom on Film website story on Albany movement story and the clip about the arrest of students protesting in front of city hall

Total Duration
70 minutes

____________________________________________________________

Procedures/Learning Activities

Essay Activity on Non-Violence

Materials and Equipment

  1. Web link to Freedom on Film web-site or handouts containing the site contents if there is no computer and/ internet access.
  2. whiteboard or chalkboard
  3. Writing materials

Step 1: Duration – 20 Minutes

Introduce the students to the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) by reading and studying the links of the following Freedom on Film stories: the Albany Movement (Albany) and the SCLC Leaders visit to the Albany pool halls.

Step 2: Duration – 35 Minutes

Lead the class in a discussion about the Brown v. Board of Education ruling of 1954 by reading and studying the links of Brown v. Board in the Library of Congress website. In the discussion highlight the significance of the Brown v. Board of Education case today and how important it was to the civil rights movement.   

Step 3: Duration – 15 Minutes

Get volunteers to share their views about the Brown v. Board of Education case. Sum up the benefits of using the non-violence approach as reflected by the success it had in Albany.

Step 4: Duration – 20 Minutes

Ask the students to write an essay about the Brown v. Board case and include the role played by Charles Hamilton among other civil rights leaders. They should name and write about documented civil rights leader who played a role in the case using the New Georgia Encyclopedia found in theFreedom on Film web-site

Total Duration
70 minutes

Assessment:

Asses the students ability to identify the characteristics of the non-violent approached used in the civil rights movement and be able to discuss the success of the approach while outlining the losses averted.

Suggested Resources (click here)

Writer: Anthony Omerikwa 
Editors: Christina L. Davis and Professor Barbara McCaskill  
Researchers: Anthony Omerikwa 
Web Site Designer: William Weems

Freedom on Film is not responsible for the content of external web sites.